Media Related to Class Action Settlement | October 2017

OTTAWA AGREES TO PAY $800M TO INDIGENOUS VICTIMS OF ’60S SCOOP

Just 4 days after the NISCW Network Bi-Giwen National Gathering, the Government of Canada announced the decision to award Survivors $750m.

Due to the massive amount of media coverage on this class action suit, NISCW Network has created a separate page on this site where you can browse all related interviews and news articles.

Below you will find most major media articles and interviews related to the class action settlement announced October 5, 2017.

Click here for reactions from the Survivors.

Just 4 days after our national gathering in Ottawa, our survivors were inundated with interview requests resulting from the class action suit settlement.

Each Survivor is dealing with this news differently and each has his/her own feelings towards not only the dollar amounts but the exclusion of Métis and non-status individuals.

Likewise, our recent gathering forced us to reach inside and face our history and tell our stories. This unpacking of emotion left us feeling vulnerable, fragile and extremely dependant on one another. We became family in that we've learned that we are not alone and that sometimes complete strangers can turn out to be all the family that you need.

 

Ottawa is right to settle with Sixties Scoop victims: Editorial

Ottawa is right to settle with Sixties Scoop victims: Editorial

Like the residential school system that went before it, the Sixties Scoop, which ran over two decades between 1965 and 1984, was an attempt to forcibly assimilate Indigenous children.

The tactics were the same: take children from their families and communities, even if they lost their language and culture. To make sure the children, who were adopted by white parents, would not return to their homes, the government even issued death certificates expunging any record of their Indigenous lives.

Métis say they should not have been left out of Sixties Scoop compensation

Some Métis who were adopted as children into non-Indigenous families say they will fight for a settlement like the one the federal government announced last week with First Nations and Inuit people who were raised in similar circumstances.

The government has agreed to settle a number of outstanding suits with victims of the Sixties Scoop, offering up to $50,000 to each person who lost their Indigenous culture and identity as a result of being removed from their homes and their communities in the 1960s, 70s and 80s.

But the Métis will not share that money.

'A small step': Ottawa Sixties Scoop survivors on federal settlement

Federal government announced $800 million for survivors

Colleen Cardinal, co-founder of the National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, was taken from her family in Alberta in 1972 and eventually adopted by a family in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

"It is a small step, but we need to have a bigger say. We need more survivors at the table, not lawyers and government. We know what's best for us and we know what we need," Cardinal said.

Since her experience, Cardinal said her focus has been on health, wellness and forming a community among survivors. The network organizes gatherings that draw people from across the country and as far away as New Zealand who were adopted out of various Indigenous communities.

PRESS STATEMENT: Congress of Aboriginal Peoples ADVOCATES THAT SIXTIES SCOOP SETTLEMENT BENEFIT ALL INDIGENOUS SURVIVORS

Details still to be worked out but lawyer Jeffery Wilson explains who is and isn't eligible for compensation

Press Statement

CAP Advocates That Sixties Scoop Settlement
Benefit All Indigenous Survivors

October 6, 2017 (Ottawa, ON) – National Chief Robert Bertrand of the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples (CAP) welcomes today’s announcement by the Government of Canada regarding the settlement with the Indigenous survivors of the Sixties Scoop. In addition to a maximum of $750M in individual compensation for status Indians and Inuit and $75M in legal fees, the Agreement-In-Principle has committed to $50M towards the establishment of a Foundation to enable change and reconciliation.

 

National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, NISCW, The Network, Sixties Scoop, Indigenous, First Nations, Inuit, Indigenous Adoptee, Indigenous Foster Care, press release, class action settlement, congress of aboriginal peoples

However, National Chief Bertrand is disappointed that the settlement does not fully recognize all of CAP’s constituents which includes non-status Indians and Métis. “I would ask the federal government as to what is to happen to those survivors who do not have Indian status or who identify as Métis?” questions Chief Bertrand. “Those countless numbers of children who, in the process of being forcibly removed from their rightful familial environment, had their Indigenous identities stolen. This settlement should take into account those who were torn from their Indigenous communities and ended up living off-reserve.”

http://abo-peoples.org/press-statement-cap-advocates-sixties-scoop-settlement-benefit-indigenous-survivors/

Ottawa's $800M for Sixties Scoop survivors a 'slap in the face,' says Alberta society president

Details still to be worked out but lawyer Jeffery Wilson explains who is and isn't eligible for compensation

The president of the Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta is frowning at the amount he's heard Ottawa is ready to fork out to over 20,000 survivors.

"That's basically a slap in the face," Adam North Peigan told CBC News Thursday.

"For the amount of trauma and the atrocities that we have faced, it's really below the line of poverty."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/sixties-scoop-alberta-ottawa-indigenous-800-million-1.4343102

National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, NISCW, The Network, Sixties Scoop, Indigenous, First Nations, Inuit, Indigenous Adoptee, Indigenous Foster Care, press release, class action settlement, alberta

Sixties Scoop compensation excludes Métis, non-status Indigenous Peoples

Details still to be worked out but lawyer Jeffery Wilson explains who is and isn't eligible for compensation

"[The claim] does not include Métis. It includes non-status [First Nations] … so long as they are eligible to be status," said Wilson. "But if they're non-status they are not, by that fact in and of itself, disqualified.

"The reason Métis are not included is because there is no records to identify Métis during the relevant period of time," he said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/sixties-scoop-settlement-excluded-1.4344355

National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, NISCW, The Network, Sixties Scoop, Indigenous, First Nations, Inuit, Indigenous Adoptee, Indigenous Foster Care, press release, class action settlement, métis leaders

Judge rules in Sixties Scoop victims' favour

Thousands of Indigenous people have won a class-action lawsuit against the federal government after child-welfare authorities took thousands of children who had been living on reserves and placed them in non-Indigenous homes


Last week an an Ontario judge ruled against the federal government in a lawsuit over the Sixties Scoop. The Scoop happened in Labrador, too. Sheshatshiu Chief Eugene Hart and Social Health Director Jack Penashue discuss.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/programs/labradormorning/the-sixties-scoop-in-labrador-1.3991218?autoplay=true

Sixties Scoop money leaves Metis survivors out

After a weekend of digesting a multi-million dollar compensation package, an organization representing Sixties Scoop adoptees says its disappointed Metis survivors were left out of the package.

“I’m very disappointed that an inclusive agreement couldn’t be reached,” said Duane Morrisseau-Beck, a Metis adoptee. “So this historic moment meant something to all Sixties Scoop survivors.”

Last Friday, the federal government announced an $800 million settlement. But it left out Metis survivors.

“I began to feel the dark feeling in the pit of my stomach. Was it true? Had they left out my nation, the Metis nation,” said Morrisseau-Beck.

Non-status survivors were also left out of the compensation package.

Local Sixties Scoop survivors say $800M settlement doesn't go far enough

One woman had dreams about being whisked away from her home in a black car. Only after she grew up and met her biological family did she learn that dream actually happened and her sisters had chased after the car as it drove away.

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/local-sixties-scoop-survivors-say-800m-settlement-doesnt-go-far-enough

National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, NISCW, The Network, Sixties Scoop, Indigenous, First Nations, Inuit, Indigenous Adoptee, Indigenous Foster Care, press release, class action settlement.

'60s Scoop class action lawyer wants provincial governments to step up after federal payout

A class action lawyer representing thousands of plaintiffs affected by the ’60s Scoop is calling on provincial governments across the country to settle outstanding lawsuits in the wake of a landmark decision by the federal government to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to an estimated 20,000 survivors.

http://thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/60s-scoop-class-action-lawyer-wants-provincial-governments-to-step-up-after-federal-payout

National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, NISCW, The Network, Sixties Scoop, Indigenous, First Nations, Inuit, Indigenous Adoptee, Indigenous Foster Care, press release, class action settlement,Tony Merchant of Merchant Law Group LLP

Ontario Children's Aid Societies working to avoid repeat of Sixties Scoop

Indigenous children still overrepresented in the child welfare system in Ontario

Ontario Children's Aid Societies have outlined commitments to guide their policies to avoid repeating the mistakes of the Sixties Scoop, but admit there is still significant work ahead.

Ontario Children's Aid Societies apologize for harm done to Indigenous Peoples

The Ontario Association of Children's Aid Societies has apologized for harm done to Indigenous children and families in the province.

The association says it made the apology Tuesday during a gathering at Rama First Nation.

Association CEO Mary Ballantyne acknowledged and apologized for the harmful role child welfare has played historically, and continues to play, in the lives of Ontario's Indigenous children, families and communities.

CTV News | Ontario Children's Aid Apologizes

CTV_News, childrens aid apology

Ottawa agrees to pay $800M to Indigenous victims of ’60s Scoop

Details of the agreement include a payout of between $25,000 and $50,000 for each claimant, to a maximum of $750 million, sources said.

The federal government has agreed to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to survivors of the ’60s Scoop for the harm suffered by Indigenous children who were robbed of their cultural identities by being placed with non-native families, The Canadian Press has learned.

The Star | October 5, 2017

Métis leaders push to be included in ’60s Scoop compensation deal

Leaders with the Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network are looking for answers as to why Métis peoples were not included in a landmark federal deal to compensate victims on the ’60s Scoop.

Humbold Journal http://www.humboldtjournal.ca/news/local-news/metis-feel-left-out-of-60s-scoop-settlement-unveiled-by-federal-government-1.23060142

Metis feel left out of '60s Scoop settlement unveiled by federal government

Duane Morrisseau-Beck, a ’60s Scoop survivor and a director of the National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, likened his feelings to when he first learned he was adopted as a child in Manitoba.

“It just brought me right back to when I was six years old,” Morrisseau-Beck said Tuesday of the federal government’s announcement last week.

“I still get chills because it really reinforced, sort of, that memory…. It goes back to feeling disconnected and not wanted.”

It’s a feeling many in the Metis community know well, he added.

National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, NISCW, The Network, Sixties Scoop, Indigenous, First Nations, Inuit, Indigenous Adoptee, Indigenous Foster Care, press release, class action settlement,

http://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/metis-feel-left-out-of-60s-scoop-settlement-unveiled-by-federal-government

We invited lead lawyer Jeffery Wilson to clarify questions being asked. We set out the questions and Jeffery’s answers:

  1. Question: Can I still sue the children’s aid societies and the Ontario government for the harm I experienced as an foster child, crown ward or adopted child.
  2. Question: Is the settlement amount for the compensation better or worse than had we gone to court on October 11, 2017 before the Honourable Justice Belobaba?
  3. Question: What about $25,000-$50,000? That doesn’t seem very much for someone who lost their cultural identity?
  4. Question: This Foundation, who will run it, and can I be part of it?
  5. What will the Foundation do?  How will I benefit from it?
  6. Question: Why are Métis not part of the deal?
  7. Question: When will we get our money and how much of it will go to lawyers?
  8. Question: When will one be able to apply for compensation and how do you do that?

https://sixtiesscoopclaim.com/2017/10/10/11781/

‘I cannot accept the apology,’ says grand chief

Chief Marcia Brown Martel, lead plaintiff in the Sixties Scoop lawsuit, Renee Linklater and Rodney Howe all shared their experience of being apprehended by child welfare as part of the Sixties Scoop.

“It is definitely encouraging to know that OACAS has come to a place to recognize their involvement in the great harm that has come to Indigenous children of this province as a result of the Sixties Scoop,” Brown Martel said in a release.

Added Grand Chief Jonathan Solomon of Mushkegowuk Council: “We recognize the good intention. It starts the wheel to apologize. At this time, I cannot accept the apology. How do you say sorry to parents who saw their child come home in a casket?”

Hill said there’s still a lot of work to do to right past injustices, which has led to widespread poverty and more complex mental-health problems affecting Indigenous peoples.

http://www.orilliapacket.com/2017/10/04/i-cannot-accept-the-apology-says-sixties-scoop-lead-plaintiff

National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, NISCW, The Network, Sixties Scoop, Indigenous, First Nations, Inuit, Indigenous Adoptee, Indigenous Foster Care, press release, class action settlement,

Sixties Scoop Agreement in Principle

Backgrounder

The Sixties Scoop is a dark and painful chapter in Canada’s history. Between the 1960s and 1980s, Indigenous children were removed from their homes by child welfare authorities and many were placed in foster care or adopted out to non-Indigenous families. Filed in 2009, Brown is the most advanced Sixties Scoop class action brought against Canada for its failure to protect Aboriginal identity when children were placed in non-Indigenous adoptive or foster homes.

On February 1, 2017, Minister Bennett announced that Canada will launch negotiations towards a national resolution to Sixties Scoop litigation as the next step in Canada’s commitment to negotiate rather than litigate Childhood Claims. The Government of Canada  and the parties have been working in close collaboration towards resolving the claims in a fair, compassionate, and respectful manner that promotes reconciliation and healing through a Federal Court dispute resolution process headed by Justice Michel M.J. Shore. The parties signed an Agreement-in-Principle in August 2017.

The Agreement-in-Principle represents a major milestone. Parties are working to finalize the agreement by the end of 2017, and will seek court approval through a fairness hearing targeted for Spring 2018.

The Agreement-in-Principle provides for a substantial investment in the creation of a Foundation for healing, wellness, language, culture and commemoration going forward as well as individual compensation to approved plaintiffs.

The key elements of the Agreement-in-Principle are as follows:

•    An investment of up to $50M by the Government of Canada to establish a Foundation to enable change and reconciliation.

-  The intent of the Foundation will be to provide access to education, healing and wellness and commemoration activities for communities and individuals and help ensure the preservation, protection and revitalization of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis languages and cultures in a way that is complementary to government programs.

- The exact mandate of the Foundation will be negotiated directly with the plaintiff representatives, their counsel, Federal Court Justice Michel M.J. Shore and representatives from Canada beginning in late October 2017.

•    A minimum of $500M and a maximum of $750M in individual compensation for Status Indians and Inuit.

•    $75M for legal fees. Plaintiffs' counsel have committed that they will not seek additional legal costs from the plaintiffs in order to ensure that compensation intended for plaintiffs is preserved for them. Additional funds will be included in the settlement agreement to cover administrative costs for the third party implementation of the agreement.

This is the first step in resolving the Sixties Scoop litigation. Canada is committed to working with other Indigenous individuals impacted by the Sixties Scoop and the provinces and territories who have already shown leadership in this area to resolve the remaining litigation.

https://www.canada.ca/en/indigenous-northern-affairs/news/2017/10/sixties_scoop_agreementinprinciple.html?_ga=2.119086345.1231776326.1507293518-1102208381.1486401700